Tag Archives: social strategy

HOW CAN SMALL BUSINESSES INCREASE ORGANIC REACH ON FACEBOOK?

How can small businesses increase organic reach on Facebook?

There’s a strategic way small businesses can increase organic reach on Facebook with minimum costs despite its push for paid posts and other issues cited in “The problem with Facebook” video.

“The Problem with Facebook” is an insightful video that raises the right kind of questions. I agree that the filtering / surfacing of feeds of friends should be better, more relevant, and ultimately decided by us, the users. Regarding the business side, now that Facebook is saying it’s time to pay rent, I think businesses should not just focus on the question of ‘Should I stay on Facebook or should I go?”

How small business can address "The problem with Facebook"
Now that Facebook is saying it’s time to pay rent, I think businesses should not just focus on the question of ‘Should I stay on Facebook or should I go?”

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Altimeter report: The state of social business 2013

“What was previously a series of initiatives driven by marketing and PR is now evolving into a social business movement that looks to scale and integrate social across the organization. The following report reveals how businesses are expanding social efforts and investments. As social approaches its first decade of enterprise integration, we still see experimentation in models and approach. There is no one way to become a social business. Instead, social businesses evolve through a series of stages that ultimately align social media strategies with business goals.” – Altimeter Group

Some highlights: Continue reading

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Source: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8523/8539048913_3328e8545c_b_d.jpg, http://www.flickr.com/photos/mkhmarketing/8539048913/sizes/l/

Key business areas that drive social media success

We want to be good in social media to become better business. But we also need to be a better business first if we want to be successful in social media.

What makes social technologies disruptive and success in social media elusive is the fact that social media in practice is not just about social media. For any social business programme to succeed, it has to be integrated with and supported by other business strategy drivers.

Many times in the process of developing social and content strategy, I’ve had to go back to the client with basic questions regarding other components of their business strategy. Sometimes I get a ready answer, but often times, my questions actually open their eyes to the other areas or issues they have to address in order to effectively develop their social presence and implement their engagement strategy. Continue reading

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Content machine or content brand?

Are you building a content machine or a content brand?

First, there was a rush to create content for the Web in the hope that we may strike gold and go viral. Then we realised that creating content was as much as science as art. To get our audience to stop, look, like, and share our content demanded creativity, usability, and resonance in our development of content. Even more difficult was to make people pause and consider our content for decision-making and purchase; and hopefully still remember us and mark us favourites once they’ve gotten what they needed. Content marketing helped us address these challenges strategically and systematically, bringing content to a business level rather than simply a tactical one. We realised that, just like with social media, content marketing is less about producing better content, and more about helping our business become better because of good quality content.

Content marketing has done such a good job in proving its worth that everyone is now hell-bent on producing content for their business. However, this is often times done at the expense of strategy and quality. It has become so easy to populate the business landscape with blogs, photos, tweets, videos, infographics, white papers, podcasts, and webinars, however unremarkable they are. What’s worse, a lot of these run-of-the-mill content are packaged beautifully: witty copy, professional design, eye-catching images, cool functionality — but all they do is just muffle the screams of mediocrity.

Social technologies have helped to make it so easy to create and maintain a social presence and leave ones digital footprints all over. But it’s getting harder to distinguish footprints from one another especially along a frequently traveled road, and track where they lead.  Companies are skipping content skills and capability development, and instead dashing headlong to the content production line. And there lies the rub. By focusing more on production, our audience finds itself confronted again with content overload (and poor quality content at that), while companies find themselves staring at an ever decreasing ‘Return of Content‘.

Simply put: the content deluge is upon us. Everybody else is creating content — even companies with content marketing skills gap. And this kind of companies are in the majority. Which means there’s a big chance that those who truly are creating good content from the inside-out will be lumped together with those creating what only looks good from the outside. How can we survive this deluge?

Screenshot from "Crap. The Content Marketing Deluge." by Velocity Partners
Screenshot from “Crap. The Content Marketing Deluge.” by Velocity Partners

The inspiring and passionate folks from Velocity Partners propose this: evolve into a Content Brand. It’s no longer enough to produce good content, or build a lean and mean content machine. We have to transcend being makers and marketers of content. We need to transform into a brand that is famous and respected for creating content that is remarkable, useful, and trustworthy. Every single time. Content that our target groups, partners, and even our own workforce will find worthy of bookmarking, saving, sharing, even repurposing for their own content. Every single time. That’s the challenge. Upholding that promise is what will make a company a great content brand.

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Social business and the 16 attributes of trust

Who do you trust? According to The 2013 Edelman Trust Barometer, neither CEOs nor government officers (although businesses are distrusted less than government).

  •  There is a crisis in leadership: trust in ethics and morality of business and government leaders is very low. It’s not surprising then why majority (64%) needs to hear company information 3-5 times to believe messages. Trusted sources are (still) experts and peers. CEO and government officer are at the bottom of the list.
  • 2/3 of the markets place their trust in banks below 50%. This trust deficit in banks is linked to culture. The causes of scandals are seen as internal and within the banks’s control ( culture of compensation and bonuses, corporate corruption, conflicts of interest).

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Infographic: Brand advocates and why they matter

Great infographic from The Dachis Group on Brand Advocacy. It gives a good overview of the types of advocates, why they matter, and how you can best connect and sustain relationships with them. Remember when it comes to buying: “people listen to people, not traditional marketing.”

[slideshare id=15001834&doc=advocateinofgraphic041-121102153817-phpapp01&type=d]

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A content-first approach is relevant to both UX and social strategy

Bas Evers talked about the importance of a content-first approach to customer experience (CX) and user experience (UX) design process  at The Web and Beyond 2012 conference held on Sept. 26, 2012 in Amsterdam. Despite the central role content plays in the touchpoint design process, it is easily overlooked and often becomes incidental rather than intentional to design and business.  One of the references he used in his presentation is from Scott Abel’s post: ” I’d Like a Little Relevant Content With My Responsive Design, Please”.

Scott Abel:
“”It is acceptable to assess your organization’s content requirements and embark on a strategy of producing indifferent content cheaply,” O’Keefe writes. “However, you should do so only after actually analyzing your content requirements. The vast majority of organizations have not thought through the implications of their laissez-faire attitude.””

“Jumping on the responsive web design bandwagon before developing a formal, repeatable content strategy, and ensuring it is connected to your content delivery mechanisms means you have not thought through the process”

I agree with this. Analysing content requirements is essential not only for issues in design strategy and device accessibility, but also for crafting social engagement strategy. Content is your currency for engagement. You shape conversations on your different social networks based on the content you and others create. These conversations impact, in turn, the quality and depth of engagement with your social networks.

Before attempting to address design and device issues with responsive web design, you must first have a content AND engagement strategy. This provides the right framework for creating responsive web design. Simply put, this assures you that scaling your content to fit different devices will not result in a decreased quality of user experience and engagement. What’s the point of making content more accessible to more devices and users (in short, spending on it) if it has lost its usefulness and relevance?

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